Your Biggest Threat: Organizational Culture

   
  
 
  
    
  
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  I recently noticed a popular post on LinkedIn. It was a basic snapshot of a gentleman speaking from stage and the PowerPoint slide behind him simply said,  "The biggest threat to innovation is internal politics, and organizational culture, which doesn't accept failure and/or doesn't accept ideas from outside, and/or cannot change." Gartner Symposium/ITxpo  Because of the popularity of the post, I wanted to explore this further. I have 20+ years in the corporate world and I have come to realize that something has shifted significantly. Compensation, title/status and career progression no longer guarantees great retention rates. The  Golden Handcuffs  are loosening, with a younger generation of professionals entering the workforce.  When a company isn’t growing, it is shrinking. When it has all of the right ingredients yet begins to show signs of stagnant or declining growth, you might want to investigate its  corporate culture .  Some great questions to ask:   ·       Are individuals valued?   ·       Does the environment use failure as an opportunity to learn?   ·       Can the organization and its leaders willingly accept that it cannot be an expert in everything, thus allowing things to be done differently “than the way it has always been done”?   ·       Can it embrace change?  If an organization wants to retain its people, it must be authentic and understand the value of its people. It must remember that these people were hired because of their skill set and experience, and its leaders must embrace the ideas that are brought before them. If a company desires to see growth and innovation it must learn to embrace change.  Guess what happens when you do this? Productivity increases EVERY time! Do you want to watch your company flourish? Try investing in your people. Militant leadership and micromanagement will decrease not just the productivity, but also the potential creativity of its people. Once that motivation is removed, people are simply doing what they must, not what they are capable of.  Lee Cockerell, author of the blog (from PayScale), which I read lately on “Turnover” said, "Simply put, companies that intentionally manage their cultures significantly outperform those that don't.”  What does your company’s culture look like? Are you attracting (and keeping) ‘Top Talent’? Is your turnover high or low? Are your employees happy and producing? Did you know that most people spend 30% of their lifetime at work? Imagine if your employees are spending all that time in a job they don't like and in a company that doesn’t value them!      OolaCorporate Training understands that growing people equals growing businesses.       

I recently noticed a popular post on LinkedIn. It was a basic snapshot of a gentleman speaking from stage and the PowerPoint slide behind him simply said,

"The biggest threat to innovation is internal politics, and organizational culture, which doesn't accept failure and/or doesn't accept ideas from outside, and/or cannot change." Gartner Symposium/ITxpo

Because of the popularity of the post, I wanted to explore this further. I have 20+ years in the corporate world and I have come to realize that something has shifted significantly. Compensation, title/status and career progression no longer guarantees great retention rates. The Golden Handcuffs are loosening, with a younger generation of professionals entering the workforce.

When a company isn’t growing, it is shrinking. When it has all of the right ingredients yet begins to show signs of stagnant or declining growth, you might want to investigate its corporate culture.

Some great questions to ask:

·      Are individuals valued?

·      Does the environment use failure as an opportunity to learn?

·      Can the organization and its leaders willingly accept that it cannot be an expert in everything, thus allowing things to be done differently “than the way it has always been done”?

·      Can it embrace change?

If an organization wants to retain its people, it must be authentic and understand the value of its people. It must remember that these people were hired because of their skill set and experience, and its leaders must embrace the ideas that are brought before them. If a company desires to see growth and innovation it must learn to embrace change.

Guess what happens when you do this? Productivity increases EVERY time! Do you want to watch your company flourish? Try investing in your people. Militant leadership and micromanagement will decrease not just the productivity, but also the potential creativity of its people. Once that motivation is removed, people are simply doing what they must, not what they are capable of.

Lee Cockerell, author of the blog (from PayScale), which I read lately on “Turnover” said, "Simply put, companies that intentionally manage their cultures significantly outperform those that don't.”

What does your company’s culture look like? Are you attracting (and keeping) ‘Top Talent’? Is your turnover high or low? Are your employees happy and producing? Did you know that most people spend 30% of their lifetime at work? Imagine if your employees are spending all that time in a job they don't like and in a company that doesn’t value them!

 

OolaCorporate Training understands that growing people equals growing businesses.

 

 

 Written by Shannon Rheault, Director of OolaCorporate Training Canada.  Shannon has been using training and education to create positive change for measurable results for over 10+ years. Shannon has a wealth of experience in the corporate world and more specifically in training.

Written by Shannon Rheault, Director of OolaCorporate Training Canada.

Shannon has been using training and education to create positive change for measurable results for over 10+ years. Shannon has a wealth of experience in the corporate world and more specifically in training.

OolaGuru