Hiring for Success

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Finding the right candidates to hire for your company can be a difficult process, especially if you are leaving out this one important step, which I will get to shortly.  Lets face it, turnover is inevitable for every organization, but what’s not acceptable is a revolving door within your company. The cost of constantly having to replace employees can crush a company’s profit and morale. If  turnover is a problem  then this blog is for you!  There is a common mistake companies make in the hiring process. If this one simple step is ignored, the chance of being successful when hiring is nearly impossible. What is this mistake you ask, it’s determining if you share mutual values. When hiring, having common values is the foundation to a successful long-term relationship.  Your company’s values define who you are, what you believe and what your company expects from its people. Start by clarifying each potential employees values to determine if they will be a good fit into your culture. Far too many companies miss this step and wonder why they have a high turnover rate. If a potential employee does not align with the values of your company, how do you expect them to believe in what you believe? How do you think they will integrate into your culture? The answer is obvious, not very well.  Identifying values should occur during the initial round of interviews. This should be done by asking some clarifying questions such as… “what are your top five values and how do you live those values?” Make sure you do this before you review your company’s values. This will prevent the potential employee from adopting your company’s values as his or her own.  Having people in your organization who do not share your values eventually becomes an obstacle to achieving your goals. They undermine the company’s mission and they contribute to a  high stress environment . If you want to  improve your culture , increase productivity and  create a fun workplace , then I would suggest you adopt this important step into your hiring process. The future success of your company is at stake.

Finding the right candidates to hire for your company can be a difficult process, especially if you are leaving out this one important step, which I will get to shortly.

Lets face it, turnover is inevitable for every organization, but what’s not acceptable is a revolving door within your company. The cost of constantly having to replace employees can crush a company’s profit and morale. If turnover is a problem then this blog is for you!

There is a common mistake companies make in the hiring process. If this one simple step is ignored, the chance of being successful when hiring is nearly impossible. What is this mistake you ask, it’s determining if you share mutual values. When hiring, having common values is the foundation to a successful long-term relationship.

Your company’s values define who you are, what you believe and what your company expects from its people. Start by clarifying each potential employees values to determine if they will be a good fit into your culture. Far too many companies miss this step and wonder why they have a high turnover rate. If a potential employee does not align with the values of your company, how do you expect them to believe in what you believe? How do you think they will integrate into your culture? The answer is obvious, not very well.

Identifying values should occur during the initial round of interviews. This should be done by asking some clarifying questions such as… “what are your top five values and how do you live those values?” Make sure you do this before you review your company’s values. This will prevent the potential employee from adopting your company’s values as his or her own.

Having people in your organization who do not share your values eventually becomes an obstacle to achieving your goals. They undermine the company’s mission and they contribute to a high stress environment. If you want to improve your culture, increase productivity and create a fun workplace, then I would suggest you adopt this important step into your hiring process. The future success of your company is at stake.

 Author: Dr. Jay LaGuardia, CEO  Dr. Jay has been in Corporate America for over 25 years helping businesses transform themselves into the business of their dreams. His passion is guiding others to their full potential so they can live their Oolalife.

Author: Dr. Jay LaGuardia, CEO

Dr. Jay has been in Corporate America for over 25 years helping businesses transform themselves into the business of their dreams. His passion is guiding others to their full potential so they can live their Oolalife.

OolaGuru